The Palazzina Di Caccia Di Stupinigi

This is another of Turin’s royal sites designed by Filippo Juvarra. It’s an exquisite hunting lodge, now on the outskirts of Turin, and is easily reached by public transport  

    

We got there early on a Saturday morning, and the building (designed in the shape of a St Andrew’s cross was glowing in the early morning sunlight. 
Inside, there was an exhibition of’littke princes’ showing Royal children in their finery!

    

Inside, not all areas are accessible, but those that are are pretty spectacular. And the hunting theme extends to the decor.

  
  
    



         

Visits also extend to the gardens where it’s possible to see a stuffed elephant, and the stables where the original of the stag on the roof is located.

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Five days in Turin

Earlier this month, I got the chance to spend a short break in Turin/Torino.  There tend to be two reactions when one says they’re going here – either “oh, the Shroud”, or “what’s there, and why are you going?”  It’s not easy to find an up-to-date guidebook in English, but we knew from our visit to Milan when we had contemplated a side trip, there were things that we wanted to see here – including the National Automobile Museum, and the royal palaces.  This was, after all, the first capital of a united Italy, and home city of the Dukes of Savoy/Kings of Sardinia who would go on to lead Italy before it became a republic.  Royal palaces aren’t hard to find.


  

So much more than 5 days could be filled here, and upcoming posts will explore a few of the sites that we had the chance to visit, armed with the great value 72-hour Torino & Piemonte card.

The city is known for its baroque splendour, long covered streets (with a grid plan nodding to the city’s Roman era heritage), and the spectacular Mole Antonelliana, home to the National Cinema museum.


  
  

Have you been to Torino – what was your favourite place to visit there?