Finding Ancient Rome in Rimini

The Roman city of Ariminum isn’t hard to find in modern day Rimini.  I loved these  signs dotted around the city centre, allowing the visitor to see where they are in relation to the ancient sights.

“Here” on the map above is the still impressiv Arch of Augustus dating from 27 BC.  The Arch marked the entrance to the Via Flaminia, the main road between Rome and Milan (in what must have been quite a circuitous route).

It also represents the start of the city’s Decumanus Maximus. which corresponds to the present day Corso D’Augusto, the city’s main shopping street.  A few minutes away stands the more open area on the map representing the ancient Forum.  Nowadays it’s the beautiful Piazza Tre Martiri, lined with cafes and shops- keeping that ancient Forum’s spirit alive!

That forum was also the location where Julius Caesar is reputed to have addressed his troops after crossing the Rubicon. He stands guard over the piazza (which used to bear his name). No-one seems to quite know that river’s current course, although there are villages in the area that have “Rubicone” in their name.  I like to think I crossed it on a train journey between Rimini and nearby Ravenna (where Caesar addressed those troops before crossing the river).

At the other end of the Corso stands the Bridge of Tiberius, like the original arch built in Istrian stone,. Remarkably, buses and cars still trundle along it daily.  

The bridge was begun during the time of Augustus, but was completed by his successor Tiberius.  It’s now over a canal – leading from the seafront and passing the lighthouse and port area shown in my previous post. But it origially stood over the river Ariminus (which gave the city its name). Nowadays that river is known as the River Marechhia, and its course bypasses the city.

Nearby, and also on the Corso d’Augusto was a great new addition to Rimini, Arimini Caput Viarum, a nod to the ancient city’s strategic road position. This was a fanstastic video depiction of hte city’s development, and its fate after the Fall of Rome.  As a free attraction, it was definitely a great way to while away part of an afternoon. 


We were also lucky enough to get free entry to the Museo della Citta which houses some great artefacts – including a model showing what the Arch of Augustus might have once looked like. While it’s impressive now, imagine that the imrpression that gleaming white stone would have had on weary travellers.

In the square outside stands a wonderful site, only uncovered in 1989 – the Domus del Chirugo (or surgeon’s house).  This is a beautifully presented and airy site protected by a modern building.  It was home to an ancient surgeon (his implants are on view in the museum), but the area suffered in the era following the decline of the western Empire.  Those beautiful mosaic floors were integrated into other buildings, and even a medieval cemetery.

Have you explored Roman Rimini and what was your favourite site?

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